Oliver Wolcott Library - Programs

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Events are updated regularly. Please check back!
  


 

Wednesday, February 22 
7:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Look of Love: An  Evening with The Pierce Campbell Trio
Click Here to Register 

Look of Love features the jazz music from artists like Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, and Duke Ellington. It will have toes tapping and heads bobbing to familiar favorites. With excellent vocals, improvisation and a stellar song selection, Look of Love has the energy and sound that will engage you right from the start.

The Pierce Campbell Jazz Trio features Pierce Campbell on guitar and vocals, Tony Pasqualoni on acoustic bass and Loren Evarts on keyboards. 

Pierce was appointed the Connecticut State Troubadour for 2007/2008 by the Connecticut Commission on Culture & Tourism and has been a full time musician for 20 years.

Tony Pasqualoni has been playing electric and acoustic bass for over forty years in various bands. Recently Tony has also been working as a stringed instrument builder and repairer, both independently and with a major musical instrument retailer.

Loren Evarts received his Master’s degree in music education, and is now an instructor for five colleges. He is currently finishing up his DMA at Boston University. Visit their website at piercecampbell.com. REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED 

 



Sunday, February 26th
1:00 - 2:00 p.m.


Agatha Christie: Book Discussion
with Stuart Barnett
Click Here to Register 

 

According to the Guinness World Book of Records, only Shakespeare and the Bible have outsold Agatha Christie in terms of overall book sales in the English language. UNESCO has identified Agatha Christie as the most-translated author of all time.

In this discussion , we will explore one of her most celebrated books:  The Murder of Roger Ackroyd.
 

Published in 1926, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd established Agatha Christie’s reputation. It is still considered to be a landmark in detective fiction. It also inspired the critic Edmund Wilson to publish his essay “Who Cares Who Killed Roger Ackroyd?” in the New Yorker. 

Despite Wilson, the novel remains in high regard - in 2013, it was voted the best crime novel ever written by the Crime Writer’s Association of Britain. The novel also triggered widespread debate over its fairness, with many critics and readers accusing it of cheating the reader. No less an authority on the topic than Dorothy Sayers felt compelled to come to Christie’s defense.

That this charge was considered seriously and that it continued to hang over the book since its publication is indicated by the fact that Christie felt it necessary to refute the charge in her Autobiography - which was written decades after the publication of the novel.

Stuart Barnett is Professor of English at Central Connecticut State University. He has published on German and French philosophy and literature. More recently, he has been lecturing and publishing on Agatha Christie. He has researched at Greenway, Agatha Christie’s house, which is now managed by the National Trust and worked with the Agatha Christie Archive, which is managed by her grandson.

Currently, he is writing a book on the cultural impact of And Then There Were None. He is also working with the US Coast Guard Museum to put on exhibit on Agatha Christie and the Coast Guard. (During WWII, her home became the headquarters for a flotilla of the US Coast Guard, which was in England to train for the invasion of D-Day. REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED
 



Wednesday, March 1 
1:00 - 2:30 p.m.

Staff Film Talk
Click Here to Register 

With so many choices on the new shelves and in our stacks, it can be difficult to find the right film or series to watch! Let us be your personal guide by hearing about what we’ve been watching.

Eighteen films or series will be shared. For each, we’ll give a brief story line, share our thoughts on the films or series, and share why you should add them to your list. A list of each film selected, along with who recommended it, will be provided at the talk as well as available for download from our website at its conclusion. After the talk, copies of all of the films and series discussed will be available for check-out!

Join OWL staff Library Director Ann Marie White, Librarian Patricia Moore, and Library Book Club Liaison Cameron Bove as we share some of our favorite films and television series. From recent releases to classic films, we’ll look at a broad spectrum of genres and styles of film and TV series. REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED



Rescheduled to Tuesday, March 14
7:00 - 8:00 p.m. 

Bombs Have No Eyes:
Stories from Japan in Support of Peace Education
with Marina Outwater
Click Here to Register 

 

Japanese school children visit Nagasaki and Hiroshima’s peace parks and museums in order to fully understand the complexities of war and the damaging effects of nuclear weapons. Japanese schools teach peace curriculums, even at the university level. And yet, in many American classrooms, children do not receive a similar education. Our students often have a limited understanding of the events of World War II in general and typically know even less about Japan’s involvement.

Marina Outwater’s recent trip to Nagasaki and Hiroshima revealed first-hand accounts from survivors who told their stories with nothing more than an intense desire for world peace. Marina will share these moving tales of several hibakusha who were young children at the time of the atomic bombings. After sharing stories and photographs, Marina will discuss the need for peace education and some strategies for implementation in the classroom.

Marina Outwater is a Litchfield resident and a veteran teacher with over twenty years of experience in middle schools. She has a master’s degree in Early Adolescent Education from Bank Street College of Education and is working towards another master’s degree in American History. This past summer, Marina spent two weeks in Nagasaki, Hiroshima, and Kyoto as part of a small study tour of twelve teachers from across the nation investigating peace through the Five College Center for East Asian Studies. REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED

 



Wednesday, March 15th
1:00 - 2:00 p.m.


The Life of Agatha Christie
with Stuart Barnett
Click Here to Register

 

Despite the days of a “Christie for Christmas” being long past, Agatha Christie remains a cultural force. The BBC is well underway in a long-term project to produce new adaptations of her classic works. And two new film adaptations of Murder on the Orient Express and Witness for the Prosecution are in the works - headed by Kenneth Branagh and Ben Affleck, respectively. Yet not enough people know about this notoriously private woman; many people assume she was an old woman who fussed about with tea and scones. Her actual life was nothing like this. Come and learn more about a woman who defied the norms of her times and led a life that will definitely surprise you. Dr. Barnett spent the last two last summers in England researching Agatha Christie’s life, with the assistance of her grandson.

Stuart Barnett is Professor of English at Central Connecticut State University. He has published on German and French philosophy and literature. More recently, he has been lecturing and publishing on Agatha Christie. He has researched at Greenway, Agatha Christie’s house, which is now managed by the National Trust and worked with the Agatha Christie Archive, which is managed by her grandson.

During WWII, her home became the headquarters for a flotilla of the US Coast Guard, which was in England to train for the invasion of D-Day. He is also working with the US Coast Guard Museum to put on exhibit on Agatha Christie and the Coast Guard. Currently, he is writing a book on the cultural impact of And Then There Were None. REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED



Wednesday, March 22 
7:00 - 8:00 p.m.

The 25 Best Heirlooms to Know & Grow

with Lawrence Davis-Hollander

Click Here to Register 

Look Experience the taste of history. Heirlooms deliver some of the best flavors and are perfect for the home gardener. Open yourself to a whole world of culinary delight, new colors and shapes. This essential journey will explore a range of vegetables appropriate for New England gardens.

Lawrence will cover a wide range of some of the most commonly grown vegetable types from lettuce to tomatoes to squash. While in some cases there are dozens of heirloom varieties available, he will give a few examples of some of the best and most easily available ones. Whether you’ve grown many kinds or none at all, Davis-Hollander’s talk will give you an overview of the heirloom vegetable world. There will be plenty of time for questions and he’ll be happy to answer any of your vegetable gardening questions!

Lawrence Davis-Hollander is an ethnobotanist and founder and director of the Eastern Native Seed Conservancy, an organization dedicated to preserving and promoting thousands of heirloom vegetable varieties. He was one of the first individuals creating all heirloom food events with prominent chefs.

He was trained as a botanist with a subspecialty in ornamental plants and art history at Connecticut College. At Harvard University he studied economic and ethnobotany with Richard Evans Schultes. He is author of Tomato: A Fresh-from-the Vine Cookbook. He currently writes for Grit Heirloom Gardener and Yankee Magazine, grows vegetables and perennials, and designs, installs and maintains gardens as a principal of Dandelion Gardening Arts, LLC.  REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED

 

 

 

 

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